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09/08/2019

Do you think my essay is good?

QUESTION
Do you think my essay is good?
The Dominant Primordial Beast
An Analysis of the novel, Call of the Wild, by Jack London

“It was inevitable that the clash for leadership should come. Buck wanted it. He wanted it because it was his nature…” (35). Jack London’s novel, The Call of the Wild, demonstrates Nietzsche’s will to power through Buck’s struggle to be the undeniable dominant leader of the pack of dogs. Nietzsche’s will to power suggests that the desire to increase one’s supremacy overpowers the struggle to adapt and survive. London’s character, Buck, exemplifies Nietzsche’s will to power, as he strives to maintain a sense of superiority over his peers through even the most harsh predicaments. Buck’s driving force within to be dominant dog of the pack depicts the will to power. Buck, not content with just surviving but dominating, craves to be strongest leader of his tribe of dogs. In order for Buck to become the authoritative figure he longs to be, he battles for the title of leader, enforces his position as dominant chieftain, and deprives the group of natives from existence to show his masterful and beastly ways.
Buck’s desire to be the transcendent leader of his peers leads him to battle for power. Spitz, showing his teeth whenever possible to show his authority, becomes a predatory rival to Buck. Due to the lustful ways of both dogs to be the “dominant primordial beast,” it was inevitable that both dogs would fight to the death. As the battle ends between Buck and Spitz, London describes Buck’s mastery and cunning as he “… stood and looked on, the successful champion, the dominant primordial beast who had made his kill and found it good” (44). London gives clear insight to Buck’s desire to preponderate, no matter what the cost. Buck dominates Spitz because of his strength physically and mentally. His mental mastery allows him to gain the trust of the weaker dogs in order to overthrow the leadership of Spitz. He creates a mutiny, and must only fight Spitz, not the rest of the pack, in order to gain his rightful place. Clearly, London understands the will to power as he explains Buck’s yearning to be the victorious dominant animal.
Buck enforces his sense of leadership due to his domination of Spitz and his will to be master of the pack. As Sol-lecks acquires the coveted position of leader, Buck questions his bearings as authoritative figure of the dogs. Buck feels he deserves the right of dignitary, and in a bound of fury leaps upon Sol-lecks and refuses to be put anywhere other than the lead position. “Buck was in open revolt. He wanted not to escape a clubbing, but to have the leadership. It was in his right. He had earned it, and would not be content with less” (46). Buck’s passion to become the entitled leader of the pack is caused by his inner fierceness. He believes he deserves the position of central authority, after killing Spitz and showing his dominance over the other dogs. In this moment, Buck gains respect for his ferocity and competitive nature to enforce his position as dominant dog, illustrating the need for power over the need for survival.
To show his allegiance to his beloved master and his ability to dominate humans, Buck slaughters the tribe of Yeehats out of rage and revenge for John Thornton. Wandering back to the camp where John Thornton and his team had set up, Buck discovers his companion dead, the Yeehats responsible for this despicable event. Out of avengement and dominating power, Buck annihilates the coalition of people that had brought on the untimely death of John Thornton. “[Buck] had killed man, the noblest game of all, and he had killed in the face of the law of club and fang” (112-113). Due to his love and adoration for John Thornton, Buck feels that his right to revenge is necessary in order to depict his loyalty and power. The domination of the tribe of Yeehats shows Buck’s willingness and compulsion to rule even humans.
Overall, Buck’s struggle for power leads him to preeminent authority. Through hostile encounters he fought for dominance, dictation to obtain the right of authority, and the destruction of a tribe to defend mastership, Buck evidently demonstrates Nietzsche’s will to power. London broaches the subject of Nietzsche’s will to power by giving insight into the life of Buck, a dog, whose main priority in life includes domination. In a broader sense, Buck acts as a metaphor for instances in human nature where humans attempt to gain ultimate power, choosing mastery over survival.

Okay, I know this is long, but I really want to know what you think. Oh, and how old do you believe i am? Thank you soooooo much!!!! And also some of the paragraphs are jumbled together so please ignore that issue.

ANSWER
(to) survive. London’s (is this the main character?) character, Buck, exemplifies Nietzsche’s will to power as he strives to maintain a sense of superiority over his peers through even the (harshest) predicaments. Buck’s driving force to be the dominant dog of the pack depicts (his desire for) power. Buck ( is) not content with just surviving but dominating, ( he) craves to be strongest leader of his tribe of dogs. In order to become the authoritative figure Buck longs to be, he battles for the title of leader, enforces his position as dominant chieftain, and deprives the group of natives from existence to show his masterful and beastly ways.
Buck’s desire to be the transcendent leader of his peers leads him to (constantly) battle for power. Buck’s counterpart, Spitz (who shows his teeth whenever possible to assert his authority) (leave the se quotation marks) becomes a predatory rival to Buck. Due to the lustful ways of both dogs to be the “dominant primordial beast,” it (is) inevitable that both dogs (will) fight to the death. As the battle ends between Buck and Spitz, London describes Buck’s mastery and cunning as he “… stood and looked on, the successful champion, the dominant primordial beast who had made his kill and found it good” (44). London gives clear insight to Buck’s desire to preponderate, no matter what the cost. Buck dominates Spitz because of his strength physically and mentally. His mental mastery allows him to gain the trust of the weaker dogs in order to overthrow the leadership of Spitz. He creates a mutiny, and must only fight Spitz, not the rest of the pack, in order to gain his rightful place. Clearly, London understands the will to power as he explains Buck’s yearning to be the victorious dominant animal.
Buck enforces his sense of leadership due to his domination of Spitz and his will to be master of the pack. As Sol-lecks ( who is this?introduce this character) acquires the coveted position of leader, Buck questions his bearings as (the) authoritative figure of the dogs. Buck feels he deserves the right of dignitary, and in a bound of fury leaps upon Sol-lecks and refuses to be put anywhere other than the lead position. “Buck was in open revolt. He wanted not to escape a clubbing, but to have the leadership. It was in his right. He had earned it, and would not be content with less” (46). Buck’s passion to become the entitled leader of the pack is caused by his inner fierceness. He believes he deserves the position of central authority, after killing Spitz and showing his dominance over the other dogs. In this moment, Buck gains respect for his ferocity and competitive nature to enforce his position as dominant dog, illustrating the need for power over the need for survival.
To show his allegiance to his beloved master and his ability to dominate humans, Buck slaughters the tribe of Yeehats out of rage and revenge for John Thornton. Wandering back to the camp where John Thornton and his team (has) set up, Buck discovers his companion dead, the Yeehats responsible for this despicable event. Out of avengement and dominating power, Buck annihilates the coalition of people that (have) brought on the untimely death of John Thornton. “[Buck] had killed man, the noblest game of all, and he had killed in the face of the law of club and fang” (112-113). Due to his love and adoration for John Thornton, Buck feels that his right to revenge is necessary in order to depict his loyalty and power. The domination of the tribe of Yeehats shows Buck’s willingness and compulsion to rule even humans.
Overall, Buck’s struggle for power leads him to preeminent authority. Through hostile encounters he (fights) for dominance, dictation to obtain the right of authority, and the destruction of a tribe to defend mastership, Buck evidently demonstrates Nietzsche’s will to power. London broaches the subject of Nietzsche’s will to power by giving insight into the life of Buck, a dog, whose main priority in life includes domination. In a broader sense, Buck acts as a metaphor for instances in human nature where humans attempt to gain ultimate power, choosing mastery over survival.

Okay, I know this is long, but I really want to know what you think. Oh, and how old do you believe i am? Thank you soooooo much!!!! And also some of the paragraphs are jumbled together so please ignore that issue.

You have a good paper, straighten up your verbs. I’ve done some of them; look for those I’ve missed. Be sure to identify each character as you go. Make sure you wrote all of this and did not plagiarize
any of it. The metaphor statement is good, but make sure it is yours alone. I’m not sure “avengement” is a word. Look it up and see. If not, say something like “his desire to avenge”
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