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01/16/2020

Examples of a dissertation in writing

Examples of a dissertation in writing
Let’s look at a list of examples of dissertation format. Some of these are very old, so it might be time to put them up for an inspection.
The thesis is the main part of the academic study. It serves as a summary of the research (and if there is more, then also the methods used). If this is not feasible or useful, then the thesis should also serve the authors’ identity and it is not suitable for any other purpose (including reprinting).
The preface, introduction or acknowledgements gives information of the paper’s content and history (often of the author, the journal and the institution that published it). There are several types:
a. A brief introduction stating who the author is and what he/she has done:
“John is from the United States, and he has published a book called The Social Capital of the USA and a book on Canada. It is available at the following address:”
b. A more detailed introduction, addressing the main points of the paper as well as the reason for doing the research:
“This paper was published on February 15, 2016, by the Canadian Journal of Political Science.”
c. The abstract of the contribution (sometimes called the beginning of the paper):
“The research, which is also described in the introduction and the preface, seeks to investigate what can be said about social capital and other variables that may affect economic, educational and social outcomes. The hypothesis of the paper is that a positive relationship between the measures of social capital and economic, educational and social outcomes is observed. If so, other variables other than social capital must be the key explanations.”
d. The list of authors:
“John is the first author of the paper that was published this August by Canadian Journal of Political Science.”
e. The conclusions:
“We argue that a positive relationship between social capital and social capital outcomes is a plausible explanation for the higher average life chances of individuals in the United States and Canada, given the greater reliance on education and knowledge to prosper and the more limited social capital of the former. The findings help reconcile the social and economic importance of education and knowledge. It appears that these factors, and not social capital, are more fundamental and important in explaining the educational and social advantages enjoyed by citizens in the United States and Canada.”
f. Summary:
“The research, which was also described in the preface, aims to address some of the more difficult issues about human capital accumulation and its determinacy in the context of the global capitalist economy.”
g. The manuscript or the document for submitting the findings to a journal:
“John is a doctoral candidate at the University of Calgary under Robert Schalkenbach. He is from the United States, and he holds a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Social and Political Sciences from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has published a book called “The Social Capital of the United States”, and a book on Canada, entitled “The Social Capital of Canada, 1851–2015″. It is available at the following addresses:”
h. The bibliography, and the list of references (if any):
“John is the first author of the paper that was published today by Canadian Journal of Political Science. He was also the initial author of the paper that was published earlier