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09/08/2019

How could i start with my book?

QUESTION
How could i start with my book?
right now, i’m overflowing with ideas and i can’t stop thinking about the book i really want to write…

though, i’m still young. (10th grade) i am trying my best to gain the neccesary skills to develop a good book.

but, should i type the chapters that i have and print them out or something?

any tips, please? ^_^

ANSWER
You start at the beginning. It’s as hardly simple as that. You need to sit back and focus because that’s one thing a book really needs: FOCUS.

Here’s what I do when I’m writing a novel. There are parts that may not work for you, or some parts might work better in a different order. I recommend you start with what I give you, then start developing it on your own:

1. Get an idea. Gather any necessary material to execute said idea. Take time to let idea grow.

2. Profile characters I am sure will be in the story.

3. Outline the story.

4. Profile any other major/semi-major characters that appear in the outline

5. Write the story, generally in order.

To give you an idea of deviations in the protocol, these are some different things you can do:

1. Start the outline with only the vaguest idea of what you want to do and let it develop from there (I do this if I have an idea that I know could be something more but I just can’t get it entirely figured out.)

2. Don’t profile characters. (I do this if the characters are recycled or I’m otherwise very familiar with them.)

3. Work with a vague outline, or none at all. (The only time I’ll work with a vague outline or no outline is if the piece is short or it’s a complete rewrite and I have the previous piece to go off of.)

4. Write the story somewhat out of order. (I sometimes go in order of the outline, but skip ahead a few numbers if I feel inspired to write a particular scene, but then I return right back to where I was and keep going.)

If you want to improve your writing, you have to practice and practice well. Practice every chance you get. Use every avenue of writing as an opportunity for practice, even if it’s just chatting with your friends on IM. For example, you could have used your Yahoo Answers! question as a way to practice grammar, punctuation, etc.

Some people say you learn how to write books by writing short stories first. I believe you do it both at the same time. Writing short stories forces you to be concise and to develop your characters is a quick, but effective way. Writing a book forces you to pace a plot properly so you can get the minimum of 80,000 words for a novel. So: write short stories as well as novels.

Read. Don’t read only in your own genre. Read everything, from the labels on cereal boxes, to philosophical musings on the meaning of life. Read about how to write well, how to write badly, how things work, etc. Read for the enjoyment and to study how the author formed his/her sentences, how s/he pulled you into the story/article/essay/poem/etc.

Learning to write any type of text well takes time. It may be a decade down the line before your work is ready to see the light of day. But keep working and have faith in yourself. Consider joining a writer’s forum, such as http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums to learn more about your craft and to enjoy the Share Your Work forums, where you can get critiques on how to improve your story and your writing in general.

And always try to enjoy writing. I’ve always found that a person’s writing sounds the worst when they’re not enjoying themselves.

Finally, learn a bit about the publishing industry. It’s never too late to start. Try going off links you find at AbsoluteWrite. Learn about literary agents at http://www.agentquery.com (since you’ll have to query an agent someday if you want to get a book published). Start reading publishing blogs, such as those found at http://pubrants.blogspot.com.

Good luck and keep writing!