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01/16/2020

Students are encouraged, however, to take their own research from the library to other reading places.

Students are encouraged, however, to take their own research from the library to other reading places.
This course may include (but is not limited to):
(A) A description, including the main parts, of the most important facts from various scientific sources; or (B) A review of the key scientific issues in the field covered by the text, including research evidence and evidence in support of the claims presented. A brief description of the research evidence is also desirable; the writer may be able to suggest where a detailed investigation might yield important results. While a thorough bibliography is not a requirement (and will be included in the class) it will be useful for the writer.
While these examples are meant only to illustrate the principles, they do give an idea of the kinds ideas in this course.
In an effort to be brief, our course materials should cover the most important data, the most significant conclusions, not a summary of the research results that led to those conclusions. Thus the course is not designed to give a scientific presentation of what has been proven. In fact it should take the reader beyond what has been proven by demonstrating the facts in an exciting yet logical way.
Prerequisites: High school graduate.
(A) Students should have a good grasp of high school biology and chemistry, and a strong research background (i.e., not a student of economics). (Students may choose to do the lab research with a mentor, but their work will be presented first because it will be more interesting to them.) (B) Students should be able to follow written instructions on laboratory work or homework problems. The writing and reading skills required are not included in the syllabus.
This course may include (but is not limited to):
(A) A written analysis or description (in a brief summary form) of important scientific facts and hypotheses as they are accepted in the peer-reviewed scientific literature. This course will cover a number of important scientific concepts, not limited by the scope of the class. We have prepared, with the help of a professional writing service, a series of short stories called “Scientific Essays.” These stories are meant to encourage creativity of the type that most scientists find to be lacking when they are asked to present their work in the classroom. A research report (which might be written in class or on-line) on a specific scientific topic is also expected. This course will use a research report written for an outside publication (often an international journal) and may use excerpts from other sources of scientific reports, such as peer reviewed journals. The stories in Scientific Essays are intended to challenge the scientific reader and provide a way to get ideas out. The writer is encouraged to use the ideas in the story or presentation to develop the work for presentation in the class. (B) Student lab research on a topic of their choice (on one topic or many) including and especially: (1) the problem of developing a research question or hypothesis; (2) the literature that contains information relevant to the question (a library of available material is ideal as background information); (3) the information available online to aid in understanding what scientific research is conducted; (4) how to select the desired research sample; (5) sampling techniques (e.g., sampling from an online survey process); and (6) designing the experiment to test a hypothesis. The lab will be conducted in the context of the class