Close

01/16/2020

Take the time to do it. You may find that, as with any text, it contains errors. You might also find that the text is in many languages, and that these are poorly expressed in the original. You are then in a position to correct (or alter) these errors by following a proper procedure.

Take the time to do it. You may find that, as with any text, it contains errors. You might also find that the text is in many languages, and that these are poorly expressed in the original. You are then in a position to correct (or alter) these errors by following a proper procedure.
3. Be prepared to revise your interpretation of the text. The first line of each chapter is usually the first example in that book and therefore has the most authoritative position in terms of what should be followed. If this is not so in your field, be prepared to revise your interpretation of the text. Be prepared to reread the book, to read more of what it contains, to try out new strategies, to look for errors. Be prepared to change your mind if the original texts contradicts what you think it ought to say.
4. Write, not copy. A student who has spent a few days at a college class without having to look at the text must be prepared to accept it as a text. A student who has spent several weeks at a class without having to think about the texts and write down what he thinks should be written, needs to be more willing to consider and rewrite the text from scratch. An important advantage of the original texts is that the teacher can check the student’s text for consistency, as he was able to do for the text in class.
5. Be prepared to rewrite. While it is possible to revise a text from the beginning, to read an old book, to review a text written by a former professor, to make the acquaintance of a new professor, there are limits to the time available to do this. If you expect to go deeper into your field of study, consider whether there are some texts that will do the job better and which can be revised later. For example, a student who already knows basic statistics and who works as an analyst needs to be prepared to revise his original text on a topic that he has never written on before, not after a short period, not at the beginning of a term. A student who is planning to take a class that is of a very technical nature has no choice but to be prepared to rewrite his text. It also depends on your ability to organize a large number of texts within the same category so that you can use one text as a jumping off point for developing the knowledge and skills needed for the new subject.
6. Be prepared for revision. Your job in any text is to revise (e.g., to change the text in two or three passages to make it more readable), not to copy. A student who has had too little time to revise a text will sometimes make the most progress in two or three days, whereas a student who has been too many minutes at a time will sometimes make little or no progress in a day. Students who want to be more productive have to be more willing to revise their texts by a few minutes every so often. In general though, when working on a text, a student who believes he is “done” will be disappointed if he has not made enough progress yet, and will be more likely to give up than to continue the revision process.
7. The process of revision is not the same for every student. A first year student in statistics will not be as successful in revising a text as a second year student in statistics. A first year student in algebra will not be as successful in rev