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01/16/2020

teachers must not spend hours on useless homework every day. This study suggests that the problem is not with homework, but the amount that is assigned, and teachers don’t adequately prepare for the assignments. “One big problem with homework is just the sheer volume of work it is given,” says the study’s lead author, Dr. Paul J. Leff, a professor in the department of educational psychology and the Institute for Learning and Behavior at Washington University in St. Louis.

teachers must not spend hours on useless homework every day. This study suggests that the problem is not with homework, but the amount that is assigned, and teachers don’t adequately prepare for the assignments. “One big problem with homework is just the sheer volume of work it is given,” says the study’s lead author, Dr. Paul J. Leff, a professor in the department of educational psychology and the Institute for Learning and Behavior at Washington University in St. Louis.
One huge problem with homework given to college freshmen is that we are expected to complete it well before we leave school. According to the report, the “fiscal cost for a typical student’s high school education is $15,000 — but the cost of high school tuition is $27,000.” And that is just tuition, not the other costs. There is a lot of other “in-kind” costs that add up. A college student also does an inordinate amount of extracurricular activities. That is not necessarily expensive, but it is costly. That $27,000 number is an expensive figure, but it is more than twice the average cost that the report claims that we pay.
Even though students are overpaid, there still isn’t a huge amount of waste in college. In the survey, only 2 percent of survey respondents said that they got paid in college to do work other than class-period grades and tests. Those two classes are where students are given the opportunity to earn money to be spent on tuition. College tuition and fees, at $27,000 a year, cost an estimated $250 billion for the 2009-10 academic year. This expense is being spread out over a very long time. Students who begin college in the fall of 2009 have taken a longer time to graduate (three years, on average) than they used to, because the average time it has taken them to graduate from high school has gone up.
The survey found that more than half (54 percent) of respondents would not feel comfortable working while at school. As an economist, my first thought is that this number isn’t high. College professors make $75,000 a year, $250,000 when they have tenured positions. The students in this survey would prefer to work for their college departments in order to make some extra money (at least when they don’t have classes that count as part of their GPA).
The survey also discovered that almost one of every four students in college has skipped class three times or more between freshman and sophomore years. This is a major waste of money in terms of lost time that could be used elsewhere.
In addition, half of students (49 percent) have taken classes during breaks from their work on the job. This is an even greater waste in terms of lost jobs and college credit, because some work cannot be done outside of class hours. (The study states that college students are using the summer to earn money, which is probably true, but not the most accurate way of going about it.)
And finally, 44 percent of college students report they have received free or reduced-priced lunch during their college career. I know I would not have been able to get into college without the free or reduced lunch program.
There are several problems associated with these numbers. First, the survey question was not designed to determine whether students are working on the job, but rather whether college students have had free or reduced-