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01/16/2020

We have to read, study, practice, and do it on our own time. By this I do not speak of reading articles that people publish but rather that books that one is likely to buy. Reading self-help books that were written thousands of years ago by people who were not always successful at life, is not something one can easily do on his own time. However, with the help of a good book and the right teacher, one can learn the art of writing and persuasive essays even though I have to spend a considerable amount of time by reading and rereading them.

We have to read, study, practice, and do it on our own time. By this I do not speak of reading articles that people publish but rather that books that one is likely to buy. Reading self-help books that were written thousands of years ago by people who were not always successful at life, is not something one can easily do on his own time. However, with the help of a good book and the right teacher, one can learn the art of writing and persuasive essays even though I have to spend a considerable amount of time by reading and rereading them.
An essay is a collection of one or more sentences. This essay may consist of one or more paragraphs of prose but more often than not it is composed of few isolated sentences of argumentation. It will not be my task to provide the following examples by themselves; one can read this whole article as a whole. We will only discuss the topics that are addressed in it.
A good argument consists of a logical argument (a logical argument is a claim of logical truth, as stated in the second definition of logical proof), an empirical argument (a claim of scientific fact which cannot be denied even if one is not personally certain of it), and the moral argument (a claim of moral truth, usually expressed in terms of justice, right and wrong) together with all the premises which support a given argument. The rest is either the facts or the implications of the facts and the arguments made about them.
The logical argument states that, for some proposition P and some evidence D, P is true. The empirical argument is based on the proposition,
If a is true this indicates that P.
The moral argument holds that this statement is false. The proposition for which the evidence is D and the evidence for which the proposition is true are called evidential arguments.
An argument is complete if (1) P is true and (2) the conclusion of the argument is either known or at least not demonstrably so to be false. This is a very stringent condition to satisfy but it is not always easy to come by. Even if someone is sure about the argument’s conclusion the conclusion may not be known. For example, most people are not certain about the conclusion that women can pass as men. There may be many plausible explanations on all sides and even if one were certain the conclusion would be uncertain. There are also other problems that should go beyond the scope of the present article, for example, determining how to test an argument.
A good analysis can be considered as a proof based on the arguments found in the arguments of the essay, and also a proof based on a previous analysis. A good analysis is always a good argument. One can make an argument for or against the possibility of some proposition P against arguments that are often called empirical arguments. In the following discussion we will take a closer look at a few of the arguments that are often called arguments in order to show how important them are. Another topic we will discuss will be what a writer of an argument should write in order to avoid making mistakes.
1. The Argument from Evidence The Argument from Evidence is a fallacy in that it claims that because a fact A is supported by a fact B one must believe both A and B. The fallacy has two aspects. One part of the argument is the logical argument. The other part of the argument is the empirical argument. Both parts are based on evidence and both