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09/07/2019

What is the argument that contradicts Sigmund Freud’s theory on dreams?

QUESTION
What is the argument that contradicts Sigmund Freud’s theory on dreams?
I’m doing an essay and can’t seem to find an argument contradicting Freud’s theory, saying dreams are NOT our unconscious desires. Links would be very helpful. Thanks.

Sorry this is in the wrong section, I’ve asked this in the psychology section but didn’t recieve any helpful answers.

ANSWER
“Stwaberries, stwaberries…”

The first time I read “The Interpretation of Dreams,” I didn’t feel like Freud had addressed nightmares very well. He just sort of glosses over dreams which come from fear or anxiety, but it feels like he’s just trying to sort of smooth them over and make them fit his theory, and not really explaining where they come from, or exactly how they could be an unconscious desire. I think you can probably use that as an argument contradicting his theory.

Here’s what I mean. A nightmare of abandonment can easily fit the wish fulfillment theory. You dream of being completely abandoned because you fear it, and your wish is that the people in your life never leave you. It can even be very specific–I don’t want my husband to leave me for another woman, or I don’t want to have to move away from home for my new job, or I don’t want my mom to have another baby because then my parents won’t be paying any attention to me. But what happens when you juxtapose that with another fairly common nightmare–the one where you’re being followed by someone, and you’re afraid they’ll harm you, and you can’t seem to evade them? Does that mean you wish to be harmed? To be followed? How does that fit with wish fulfillment? On the surface it seems like a pretty simple dream to analyze in the Freudian way, except that no answer you come up with makes any sense.

I was trying to explain this all to someone who hasn’t read Freud a while ago. I found a scholarly paper that talks about Freud, and his dream theories. It discusses what he seems to be right, and what seems to be wrong. Here it is:

http://psych.ucsc.edu/dreams/Library/dom…

I hope that will at least be of some use to you.