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09/04/2019

When an author starts different novels in a similar way?

QUESTION
When an author starts different novels in a similar way?
I don’t know if there is even anything such as this, but is there a specific literary term used to describe when an author starts a novel in a similar way has a previous one? I’m writing an essay, and I’m comparing the Hunger Games and Gregor the Overlander (both by Suzanne Collins).
Hunger Games starts with Katniss waking up, explaining how she must take care of her sister now that her father has died, and Gregor the Overlander starts off the same way, explaining how he takes care of his sister because his father disappeared.
Is there a term to describe this?

ANSWER
It’s just a great way to start a novel. Start with telling the readers about the story settings so the readers could imagine how the landscape and life might look like in that time. So, the readers could understand the story. If we don’t start a novel that way, the readers will be mixed up. Like in the book “The Outsiders”, S. E. Hinton started the story by telling the readers the main character was living in Oklahoma in the 60s’. The detail that the main character was living in the 60’s was not told directly in the story but through the details “When I stepped out into the bright sunlight from the darkness of the movie house. There was only two things in my mind: Paul Newman and a ride home.” Paul Newman was famous in the 60s’ so the readers could easily understand the settings of the story.