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01/16/2020

You don’t have to be a writer to participate – you can also participate in any of the activities included for people with mild, moderate, or severe attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. However, you’ll be better able to complete the project if you’ve at least tried to write in your journal at least once.

You don’t have to be a writer to participate – you can also participate in any of the activities included for people with mild, moderate, or severe attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. However, you’ll be better able to complete the project if you’ve at least tried to write in your journal at least once.
Participating in Essay Writing
Create your essay in a word processor or word processing program, using one of the templates available online. (Easiest is to use the template that features each of the four activities. Other options include the free one. Be sure to search for the word “sloppy” to make sure you’re not using the original.)
To start the paper, pick a topic, write about it, and then create and print an essay.
A note about essay-writing programs. Most of them are not designed for essay writing. Instead, they are designed for reading. If you’re looking for a tool that will help you do your writing while you walk, you’ll likely find it more helpful to go back to our shopping guide.
Check out the Essay Writing Resources & Tips for more ideas.
Sample Essay Writing ProjectSixty-six years ago, on March 6, 1947, on the morning of Pearl Harbor, President Harry Truman sent out a series of messages to a number of allies and countries about America’s intentions to help defend the United States. The content of these messages, however, were not the American public’s final determination about whether war with Japan was advisable. The public would have to make a different decision about whether a war should be fought. At that moment, the U.S. public was overwhelmingly opposed to any involvement in a war against Japan, with the exception of a few individuals, and most Americans were opposed to getting involved in a global conflict based on the pretext of defending U.S. territory.
To support the United States’ decision to remain neutral, President Truman used three key arguments to persuade other countries in the Western democracies that the United States would not be drawn into war:
If the United States was not involved, the world would feel free, at some future date, to enter into a war that the U.S. stood against.
If the United States was involved, the military conflict would be of great costs and would bring great loss of life.
If a war that the United States was involved was not an absolute necessity, it might not be worth the losses to fight it, and American lives would be saved, or more lives would be saved in the future.
The public was not convinced that it was in the U.S. national interest to be involved in war against another state with which it had conflicting interests. As the historian Ronald Press has shown, Truman’s arguments succeeded, at least partly because they were supported mainly by influential opinion leaders and political leaders who had previously been allied with the United States.
In this article, I examine the three reasons that Truman used in his messages to Britain, Canada, Australia, and other allies to show that war was not desirable. I also discuss why the public was not convinced that it would be in the U.S. national interest to be involved in war. Although Truman received an overwhelming response among the public to his messages, war did not end up being inevitable in the postwar decades. We also see that the public had the information